How Do You Stop Your Pet from Chewing & Destroying Stuff

Dogs are quite famous for chewing away at their owner’s pretty paper-back novel, or if left unattended to, an important document.

Black dog on grass gnawing at large blue and orange tennis ballThe mere thought of this has your irking because your dog doesn’t lack wonderful toys to play with, and if so pleases, to chew on. If you are already noting these destructive tendencies in your dog, now’s the time to handle it- before it gets completely out of hand.

You can get your german shepherd shedding solution here.

So how do we bid this trait goodbye, or at least, keep it in check?

 

1. Play with Your Dog

If your dog isn’t meaningfully engaged in mentally stimulating activities, he or she might be tempted to engage in destructive entertainment. So here’s your cue to play with your canine more. Indoor games might be particularly helpful if you don’t allow them to go out much, and if they are lone dogs in your house/life.

However, if you have more than one dog, dog puzzles might be something super sweet for you to invest in. They might play with these puzzles by themselves, or you could join in the fun.

2. Get Creative

Many dog lovers purchase numerous toys for their dogs. Do you know what happens when your dog has several toys with which they can play, at the same time? They stop treating these toys as anything special.

So here’s what to do: rotate these toys so that only two or three of them are available at any given time. Therefore, when you rotate them this way, your dog doesn’t get so familiar with the toys that they lose interest in them.

3. Keep Your Stuff Out of Reach

To be honest, you can never say what your dog would be interested in chewing on, all the time.

The only foolproof way to, therefore, keep your possessions safe from being destroyed or chewed on, is by keeping them out of your dog’s reach.  

And if the dog likes to chew on stuff like your furniture, it just might be better to keep them out of the room if they will be unsupervised there.

4. Establish Rules and Punishment

If your dog realizes that bad behavior attracts punishment, he or she is likely to act good (well, fake it till we make it, shall we doggie?)

Therefore, as a crucial part of training your dog, if you notice him/her be all chewy on your important stuff, establish a clear punishment, and communicate it to the dog. It could be something as simple as not allowing them into the house, sending them back into the cage, or depriving them of an extra bone or whatever catches their fancy. Do this enough times, and they would have associated the bad behavior with the punishment enough times to start acting right… a couple of weeks later and the act has become what they’d naturally do.

 

Your dog might have a problem with chewing, but if you don’t have a problem with being creative, establishing rules without doggy’s cute eyes getting in the way of playing with your dog; then you both are on your way to living happily in each other’s space. Remember that all dogs need affection and training!


Author Bio:

Dancun Kingori

Dancun has been working with writing-challenged clients for over five years now. He offers ghostwriting, ghost editing, coaching, and SEO writing for businesses that want to see their sites at the helm of Google SERPs. His education background in communications and public relations has given him a concrete base from which to approach different topics in various niches. His writing skills can be confirmed on upwork.com, where he is a top-rated freelance writer. He especially enjoys writing website and blog content for startups and established businesses.

1 reply
  1. Alex
    Alex says:

    I have a 5-year-old mixed breed dog, who was rescued from the street and at the beginning it was difficult to take away bad habits but with love and help from this program (http://bit.ly/2nAyJcQ) and much patience she was able to adapt to her new home.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply